Britney Spears mocked over her "actual singing voice" in funny Instagram video

Britney Spears has been mocked by fans after singing an Aretha Franklin hit with a Snapchat voice filter.

Spears, 36, shared a video of herself belting out the powerhouse’s 1967 single (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman in a high pitched voice.

Spears sang the chorus a capella while also masked by the tiger filter, giving her a whiskered nose and striped ears.

She captioned the Instagram post with pink flowers and a four leaf clover.

Fans were quick to mock Spears, who has faced accusations of lip syncing and auto tuning her voice during live performances, joking that the high pitch tone is actually her real singing voice.

One joked: “When you didn’t have time to edit your voice.”

Another commented: “That"s how you actually sound without auto-tune.”

A third wrote: “Thats ur normal singing voice isn"t it? lol!”

A fourth asked: “Still using voice dubbing eh Brit?”

Others begged her to post a clip singing naturally with one hailing her the “queen of vocals”.

Britney Spears cat impression on Instagram

It’s not the first time the pop princess has used the cat filter, after previously pretending to be a British feline as she attempted to master the accent while asking for some milk.

Spears is currently gearing up for the UK leg of her Piece of Me World tour which will see her perform a headline set at Brighton Pride in August.

Next year she will embark on a new residency at The Park MGM which will make her the “highest-paid woman” on Las Vegas’ strip.

She recently opened up about her tour diet, revealing it isn’t all clean eating, as she often orders herself McDonald’s.

“I have the small burgers from McDonald’s,” she told Entertainment Tonight. “The happy meal!”

Source: https://www.standard.co.uk/showbiz/celebrity-news/britney-spears-mocked-over-her-actual-singing-voice-in-funny-instagram-video-a3880886.html

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